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The Force of Character

05 Dec

For the longest time the debate was between Nature and Nurture as to which shaping force was greater in determining human personality, behavior, and destiny. Genetic determinism or social engineering (aka behaviorism) each argued for the larger role, with pretty much everybody agreeing that both were somehow in the mix.

Had anyone bothered to ask the therapists, counselors, or your reputable “good listening friend,” they would have learned that more than nature and nurture is in play on this question. There’s also the force of momentum as it builds through our repeated beliefs and behaviors over time. The first enactment requires focused deliberation, but with each repetition it becomes a little easier, a little more automatic, using less and less conscious effort as this momentum starts to take over.

What we’re describing can be called the force of Character, borrowing directly from the way the identity of a narrative character becomes more “solid” and predictable as the story progresses. It belongs with Nature and Nurture in our best understanding of what shapes and determines human experience.

In addition to our genetic predispositions and social conditioning, then, our cumulative habits of thought, judgment, behavior and belief – that is to say, our character – make us who we are.

The references to story are especially fitting in this discussion, since our personal identity is also a narrative construct. Who we are – as distinct from what we are as human beings – is something put together, literally composed out of numerous storylines that tie us to roles, anchor us in role plays, and shape our identity to the groups where we belong.

Inside those external storylines are others that define us internally, to ourselves. These conspire to form our self-concept, self-esteem, and self-efficacy, referring to how secure, capable, creative, and resilient we see ourselves as being. Our internal storylines are ever-present as our continuous self-talk, in the steady stream of thoughts and opinions we repeat to ourselves.

As my diagram illustrates, with repeated performances of these external and internal scripts our character becomes more solid and predictable. Our identity eventually gets so determined by our past that it can seem impossible to break the habit of who we are.

It helps me to think of this using the principle of complementarity from elementary physics. Also known as the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, it states that quantum reality will “behave” as a particle or a wave depending on how the researcher sets up the experiment. At that level, energy can either be defined by its discrete position (as a particle) or measured for its dynamic flow (as a wave) – but never both at once.

These both turn out to be true representations of quantum reality, but we must choose which way we see it.

Another analogy is the Rabbit-Duck Illusion. Looking at the image, you can see the head of a rabbit or the head of a duck, but not both at once. The image “behaves” according to what you are expecting to see.

All of this relates back to our discussion on character in the following way. Character itself – our personal identity as composed of multiple intersecting external and internal storylines – corresponds to Heisenberg’s particle: discrete, holding its position, and apparently solid.

But if we choose, we can also understand personal identity as a “wave” of countless interweaving narratives. And the dominant storyline, which I will call our “active story,” is the one we are telling ourselves and others right now. It’s also likely the one we’ve been telling ourselves for quite some time, qualifying it as our personal myth.

Back to my diagram. A correlation exists between our character (particle, rabbit) and active story (wave, duck) such that early on, when character is still getting set, our active story has a broad scope. A broader scope to our story means a wider spread of possibilities before us. When we are young and the momentum of character is still relatively undefined, the future ahead of us seems broad with many options and we frequently engage in imagining what we will one day grow up to be.

As our repeated thoughts, judgments, behaviors and beliefs take on a more solid and predictable shape (i.e., character), however, the scope of our active story begins to narrow down. Our choices effectively eliminate or close down some possibilities as we commit ourselves to our personal quality world. A benefit of this narrowing effect on the scope of our active story is that its range also starts to lengthen.

As we enter adulthood, our active story provides a longer view on the future, even as our options are reduced in number. We get a stronger sense of direction and purpose, which is another way of saying that our character becomes more set: we know who we are, where we’re going, and why it matters.

Morality at this point is less about following rules and obeying authority than behaving and believing in a way that’s consistent with who we are – being true to ourselves, as we say. Now, if our identity is one of positive belonging, social responsibility, and ethical commitment to the greater good, then being true to ourselves is a good thing indeed.

It can happen, though, that our character gets formed by negative storylines, such as abuse, insecurity, shame, resentment, and self-doubt. Once it gets set, being true to ourselves can be pathologically self-centered and socially destructive. To us it feels like righteousness and living by the strength of our convictions, when our active story is actually bringing down the Apocalypse.

My returning reader is familiar with my characterization of conviction as belief that holds the mind hostage (like a convict). Now we can see how character-formation and conviction go together. Our active story narrows down to just one line of truth (“the only way”), and our conviction prevents us from even seeing alternatives, much less considering them.

This is how we bring down the Apocalypse. The most destructive human actions in history have been driven by conviction, committed for the sake of and in devotion to some absolute truth.

The rest of my diagram shows how the construction of identity (ego) requires our separation from all that is “not me.” From this vantage-point, we can look outward at the objective world, literally “thrown over” and around us, as well as inward to our subjective ground, “thrown under” or beneath us. It’s important to understand that these two realms and our access to them are conditioned upon a stable, balanced, and unified sense of self (called ego strength).

If our character has been set by negative storylines and our convictions are righteously inflexible, we are unable to engage the objective world responsibly or cultivate our subjective ground for inner peace and wellbeing. In this case, the force of character trumps (pun intended) nature and nurture, committing us to a path of suffering and self-destruction.

Hell, we might as well bring everybody else down with us.

 

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3 responses to “The Force of Character

  1. Shari Martin

    December 5, 2019 at 4:52 pm

    Hello!
    It has been forever but just wanted you to know that I still very much look forward to and enjoy these thought provoking tracts. I do not understand how our society has changed so much for the worst in the last several years. To stay hopeful or at least avoid the depths of depression I have to avoid most news type shows, etc. Your writings also help me and I thank you for that. I hope all is well with you and your family.

    Happy Holidays!
    Shari Martin

     
    • tractsofrevolution

      December 6, 2019 at 9:38 am

      Shari! It’s great to hear from you! I’m glad you’re enjoying the blog, and hope your holidays are joy-filled as well.

       
  2. John and Sharon Kleinheksel

    December 5, 2019 at 7:23 pm

    John, There is profundity here. Amazing thoughts on trying to make sense of early formative influences and the maturation process. Love the illustration of the “rabbit/duck”. And that, applied to the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. Quantum theory fascinates me, the particle/gravitational wave aspects of reality. The meaning of “seeing” (perspective) also fascinates. “Come and see” Jesus says to his disciples in John 1 (a theme of John I think). (Chapter nine especially). And a veiled reference to our President? Hmmmmm. Self-destructive impulses are his specialty. He is going about it methodically and inexorably I think. “Conviction” as blotting out character deficiencies in you and me is scary. Sounds like you’ve got something there. Thanks for calling your dad repeatedly. We keep praying for him. . . and for you and your family. Do you have a regular group studying your material? Surrounding you with peer conversations? iron sharpening iron? We met in our men’s discussion group again this a.m. Usually about 12 of us (retired clergy and college/university educators). Stimulating. Today on death and dying and the after-life. . . . I’m attending a class tomorrow at HOPE on the “Philosophy of the Mind”. Should be absorbing and educational. One of the Philosophy Department profs. Salaam/Shalom to you my family friend. . . . . John (I’m attaching a couple of tasty tidbits. . . .)

    On Thu, Dec 5, 2019 at 1:32 PM tracts of revolution wrote:

    > tractsofrevolution posted: “For the longest time the debate was between > Nature and Nurture as to which shaping force was greater in determining > human personality, behavior, and destiny. Genetic determinism or social > engineering (aka behaviorism) each argued for the larger role, with” >

     

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